2017 Master Brewers Conference
 
72. Sensory analysis of beer made with 2200 vs. 3700 PSI CO2 hop extracts

Victor Algazzali, John I. Haas, Inc., Yakima, WA, U.S.A.

Coauthor(s): Michael Visgil, John I. Haas, Inc., Yakima, WA, U.S.A.

Poster
Hops

Supercritical fluid extraction with carbon dioxide is a technique used to concentrate the desirable components of hops for brewing applications. In processing, the pressure (PSI) set point is a key parameter that effects the composition and quality of the final hop extract. This study investigated two common hop extraction pressures, 2200 and 3700 PSI, to determine if they impart different flavors to beer in the brewing process. The first set of brewing trials investigated the bitterness quality of 2200 and 3700 PSI extracts. Two extracts were made from CTZ hops, a commonly used bittering hop, at 2200 and 3700 PSI. The extracts were produced on a CF Technologies Pilot CO2 Extractor at John I. Haas, Inc., in Yakima, Washington. Brewing trials of these extracts were conducted on a 15-gallon MoreBeer! brewing system. The CTZ extracts were added as 60 minute bittering additions in the boil kettle, targeting 40 IBUs. Sensory analysis on the two beers indicated no significant difference between the 2200 and 3700 PSI CTZ extract in triangle testing (N=16). Similarly, descriptive analysis testing showed no differences in bitterness intensity or astringency as measured by a trained hop panel (N=16). The second set of brewing trials investigated the hop aroma and flavor of 2200 and 3700 extracts. Citra was chosen as a common pungent aroma variety, and extracts were produced at 2200 and 3700 PSI. The extracts were dosed into the whirlpool to maximize the flavor impact of the beers for sensory analysis. Sensory analysis on the beers indicated there was no significant difference between the 2200 the 3700 PSI Citra extract in triangle testing (N=12). Descriptive analysis testing showed no significant differences in the 15 hop flavor attributes as measured by a trained hop panel (N=12). These results indicate that no substantial differences are produced in flavor between 2200 and 3700 PSI hop extracts. Furthermore, the beers made from 2200 and 3700 PSI extracts were of equal quality, with indistinguishable bitterness and hop flavor.

Victor Algazzali began his career at John I. Haas, Inc., in 2014 as a flavor sensory chemist. He manages the sensory program, a trained panel on hop and beer flavor, and assists in new product development. Before John I. Haas, Victor received his master's degree in food science from Thomas Shellhammer's lab at Oregon State University and worked as an intern at Deschutes Brewery in Bend, Oregon.

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