2017 Master Brewers Conference
 
67. Brewing with 100% malted buckwheat: A gluten-free alternative incorporating extraneous enzymes

Kayelani Roy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Coauthor(s): Allan Paulson, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Andrew MacIntosh, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Alex Speers, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Poster
Enzymes, Extracts, Other Ingredients

A method for producing a spirit from 100% buckwheat wash was developed. Because buckwheat is a gluten-free pseudocereal, its use as a brewing ingredient has become increasingly popular. However, its lack of diastatic power limits the yield of fermentable sugars obtained from mashing. To overcome this hurdle, combinations of alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 amylase, as well as glucanase and protease enzymes, were added to the mash. By varying mash time (90 to 140 min), temperature (45 to 80 °C), and enzyme content, a mashing regime was developed to achieve 10 °P, reflecting a 4 °P increase from native buckwheat malt without the addition of enzymes. Additionally, two strains of yeast, Extra Special Bitter (ESB) and wheat beer yeast, were used to explore the effect of yeast strain on the production of volatiles during fermentation and their retention after distillation. Spirits collected from buckwheat wash and fermented by ESB or wheat beer yeast had noticeable differences in aroma and intensity indicating that some of the unique volatiles generated by yeast during fermentation remain in the spirit cut during distillation. This may provide an opportunity to develop uniquely flavored distilled beverages from buckwheat.

Kayelani Roy is a fourth-year undergraduate student at Dalhousie University completing a B.S. degree: major in chemistry, minor in food science. She is motivated to pursue a master's degree in food science. Currently, she is employed as a technician in connection with Canadian Institute of Fermentation Technology (CIFT) brewing research for the second consecutive summer.

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