Brewery Engineering and Utilities Course

Full Course Description

The Master Brewers Engineering and Utilities Technology Course is an intense two-week immersion into the science and technology of brewery systems and engineering design of brewery systems. Students engage in over 30 presentations from over 20 industry experts. The expected outcome from students attending the course will be a greater understanding of the scientific principles and operational understanding and guidelines associated with the main disciplines with brewery engineering and utility systems. Students will engage with industry experts in a two-way exchange of ideas and questions. Students will interact with classmates in class projects that promote greater understanding, interaction, and networking. 

The overall objective of this class, beyond the exchange of years of knowledge and involved networking, is for students to leave with a greater understanding of why processes occur or are needed and how engineering technology principles define the groundwork for brewery utility system design and operation. This class is about understanding how to greater interact within brewing engineering and utility technology rather than a series of lectures on exact rules and methods of the operation and maintenance of brewery systems. Students will return to their respective homes with a better perspective on the industry, a clearer understanding of the why’s and how’s of brewing utility and engineering technology, and a greater ability to interface and learn with the general principles provided. 

Students entering the class should have a greater-than-basic understanding of high school level mathematics including algebra and geometry, a basic understanding of engineering and operational technologies, and a willingness to learn and engage. It is always best for students who take this class to have a more-than-basic understanding of brewery utility systems. However, should a prospective student have the drive and interest, these recommended prerequisites should not be considered a barrier to attendance.