A modern mash filter.

MBAA TQ vol. 11, no. (4), 1974, pp. 233-239 | VIEW ARTICLE

McElevey, C.A.

Mash filters have been used in Europe since 1890 and in the United States since 1913. They have shown advantages in saving floor space and have produced higher brewing efficiencies than lauter tuns. Formerly they required more labour to operate. Today, the automated or semi-automated mash filter has the same labour requirement as a lauter tun operation. A modern mash filter operation relies on an automated opening and closing device, an automated plate shifting mechanism and polypropylene filter cloths, which can be cleaned in place and which last from 500 to 1000 brews. Automated plate shifters have been in use since 1963 and polypropylene cloths since the late 1950's. The crushed grain cake should contain 20% flour or less. This along with proper cake density, mash volume, flow rates and pressure will permit up to 16 brews per day at brewing efficiencies equal to those attained by using 2 lauter tuns also producing 16 brews per day.
Keywords: automatic brewing cleaning construction efficiency equipment filtration mashing  


© Copyright Master Brewers Association of Americas